Recently we started a project with portable signals. Before the job bid we suggested portable signals as a cost-effective alternative to hardwired temporary signals mounted on posts and powered by a generator. The agency agreed but asked for most of the optional features. Those included wait time display, drive way assistance device, backup generator, emergency vehicle preemption, and remote monitoring and notification.

Let’s look at each of these in a little more detail.

The wait time display is a changeable message sign attached to the articulating arm of the signals. When the signal at the other end of the work zone is green, the one facing stopped traffic tells it the maximum time they can expect to wait. Then, once the signal on the other end goes to red, it displays a countdown to green equal to the remaining clearing time.

This is a great feature when the work zone is especially long or when drivers on one end of the work zone cannot see the other end. Like travel time systems, once drivers know what the wait time is, they don’t seem to mind it as much. But not knowing often upsets them.

The driveway assistance device is another clever addition. The display consists of a red light and two flashing red arrows, one pointing right and the other left. When the light is red, drivers are expected to stay put. But when the right arrow is flashing, they can turn right when it is clear. The device ties into the signal phases on the main line. The system knows when traffic is moving to the right and tells the driveway assistance device to inform any drivers there that they may do so, too. It’s similar to a WAIT FOR PILOT CAR sign, but starts the moment traffic is cleared to go in that direction.

Backup generators. the portable signals come standard with 440 watt solar but if you will be placing them in a location that gets considerable shade throughout the day you may want to consider a backup generator. We offer several different options depending on the location, so ensure that you contact us to figure out what solution would be best for you. 

Emergency vehicle preemption is the same as most permanent signals use. It immediately turns the signal on the other end red, but still must give the same clearance time before turning to green for the ambulance or fire truck. Because these signals are farther apart, sometimes a half mile or more, the emergency responder must still sit there until traffic clears. Otherwise the potential for conflicts exists. This is one feature I would not recommend again, except when the signals are set up for a conventional intersection where clearing time is minimal. Or when there is an especially high volume of traffic that would otherwise extend the green time without preemption.

Remote monitoring is just what it sounds like. The signals report to a server over a wireless digital modem. All aspects of signal operation are monitored. If a lamp fails, or power drops, or communications between signals are lost; an alarm is sent to everyone concerned via text or email. Signal operations are also logged with each phase date & time stamped. So if a motorist claims they were green when they were actually red, the agency would be able to prove that.

Traffic engineers have taught drivers to expect traffic signals to do certain things. Portable signals can now do anything that permanent ones can do. That reinforces those lessons and makes our work zones safer.

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